Sunday, 28 May 2017

Away at True Survivor: No Sermon this Weekend

Fr Dylan is away being chaplain at True Survivor www.truesurvivor.uk

This photo is from when I joined True Survivor in 2016. As of 2017, I'm now chaplain to True Survivor, Bishop Mark O'Toole is our patron, and Will Hince will soon be doing this full time as part of a registered charity.




Sunday, 21 May 2017

Away in the Holy Land: No Sermon this Weekend

Fr Dylan is on a parish pilgrimage in the Holy Land this weekend

Sunday, 14 May 2017

Enjoying Beer with Jesus, 5th Sunday of Easter, Year A



1 Pet 2:4-9
I want to talk to you today about 3 things: Drinking beer, enjoying chocolate, & doing these with Jesus.
I want to talk about this for 2 reasons:
First, on Easter Sunday someone came up to me puzzled. He said: “A few weeks ago you were telling us to ‘give up’ things, and that you were not eating chocolate, and that there won’t be chocolate in heaven. But now, you’re saying we should be having 50 days of feasting. I don’t understand! Which is it?”
Second, our second reading, from St Peter, said we should “offer” our very selves as “spiritual sacrifices” to Jesus. Now, many of us somehow think we can “offer it up” when we are suffering, but don’t understand how to “offer up” our rejoicing and our feasting.



Here’s the thing: There is a notion of God that somehow thinks that God is only happy when you are miserable, that a “good” Christian is someone who is miserable and sad.
This, I want to say very clearly, is a heresy, and very damaging one.
In England, it has its roots in the Protestant Reformation and Puritanism. Those of you who know your history will remember that Oliver Cromwell banned Christmas in England. Puritanism has a very confused notion of pleasure and enjoying yourself, whereas the Catholic view says this:
Nature comes from God’s hands, He made it.
It is to be enjoyed, WITH Him;
But, it is to be enjoyed in the MANNER that He has established:
Beer and chocolate, but in moderation, not in gluttony;
For His first miracle the Lord Jesus turned water into wine, He didn’t turn it into fruit juice.
The problem for us in England, even those of us who are Catholic, is that we’ve been infected with the remnants of this Puritanism: So when we enjoy things, we somehow exclude God from them.
The old TV advert, “Naughty, but nice”, was a modern incarnation of this Puritanism -if something is “nice” is must somehow be forbidden, be “naughty”.
And, the Irish among us can have a different problem: the French Jansenist heresy infected much of Ireland with a similar mind-set: pleasure is bad.

What then is the authentic Catholic position?
When we look to our roots we see that Catholics believe in times of feasting as well as times of fasting.
Both of these are done by unbelievers too: they feast, they diet.
BUT these two things, when done WITH JESUS are done very differently. And this is a CRUCIAL thing to grasp is we are not only to have God through ALL our life, but also if we are to TRULY enjoy things properly.

So, having God in my WHOLE life. How does that work?
First, When I enjoy my chocolate, when I enjoy my beer:
I think of God:
I thank God for them;
I choose to use them in the manner in which God has established, following His moral laws;

I don’t feel any guilt about them -they are from God.
This means I come to God both in good things and in bad.
To emphasise what I just said, it means that I have to use these pleasures in the MANNER that God has commanded:
Moderation, not gluttony: not too much chocolate, not too much beer.
Otherwise I spoil a good thing, and guilt then does become appropriate.
And, even more tragically, the sinner is a slave to his sin, the glutton is slave to his pleasure.
Alcohol owns the drunkard; it is the MODERATE man who is FREE to truly enjoy it. The addict, the glutton, the sinner -none of these enjoy life and enjoy the pleasures of life the way the virtuous Christian can
And the pleasures of the bedroom, these can be with God, or He can be excluded -to our detriment.

In summary: offer your very lives to God, as a spiritual sacrifice (1 Pet 2:4-9)
Offer your 40 days of fasting in Lent;
Offer your 50 days of feasting now in Eastertide -be at union with Him in all things
And give back to Him the life He has given to you.

Sunday, 7 May 2017

Vocations Letter & New Evangelisation Message from Bishop

For Vocations Sunday, Bishop Mark O'Toole has issued a pastoral letter which you can read here



It refers to his new pastoral message 'Go make Disciples' which you can read here

Sunday, 30 April 2017

Footprints, 3rd Sunday of Easter



Lk 24:13-35
I want to say a few words this morning about about how The Lord accompanies us in our difficulties.

Often when we are finding life most difficult, it can be at those moments that we fail to see The Lord, fail to recognise that He is with us. When things seem tough, we feel like we're alone.
Maybe when we feel that our work, our labours, our talents, whatever we're doing -we feel like we not appreciated.
Maybe when we feel the physical pains of life -burdens that seem like they just won't go away.
Maybe when we feel cut off and alone in other ways.
Being in difficulty can be a very LONELY experience, and, ironically, it can be something that prevents us seeing the presence of the very ones who might be trying to support and accompany us.

If we think of the resurrection appearance to the two men on the road to Emmaus we see a similar pattern: their absorption in their difficulties, in "all that has been happening in Jerusalem these last few days" (Lk 24:18); about how their hopes that Jesus was the Messiah had been crushed by His arrest and crucifixion. -it seems that they were so absorbed in their pain that they didn't recognise that The Lord Himself was there by their side.
There is one other resurrection appearance when we see the same pattern, when Mary Magdalene is so caught up in her grief and weeping by the tomb that she fails to recognise The Lord Himself until He calls her by name, "Mary"(Jn 20:16).

We don't really know why they didn't recognise Him at first, it's quite unlike the other resurrection appearances in this regard, all we have is this obscure phrase, "something prevented them from recognising Him"(Lk 24:16). My own thought is that it might be linked with the all-too-common human phenomenon of being unable to recognise good things, and recognise The Lord, when we're wrapped up in our problems instead -or, at the very least, I think we can interpret it as being symbolic of this human phenomenon:

In both cases The Lord was there, the Risen Lord was there to console them, but it took some time for them to recognise Him.
Let me note further: it's not just that He was there, but He was there in His RISEN form -I.e. He was there to support and console them. And yet, despite the fact that the very reason He was there was to console them, they didn't see Him.
The point, for ourselves, is this:
We too have our problems, our pains, our experiences of isolation.
We too have these moments when it seems like the very times when we most need The Lord, it seems He isn't there.
But, for us, as for the men on the road to Emmaus, despite what we FEEL like, He is walking by our side. Even more, by grace He is within us, He is strengthening us, He is the One who is enabling us to go forward at all.
This, as I'm sure you've all heard before, is expressed in the old poem, 'Footprints', a version of which is on the sheet in the newsletter and we'll be singing later in the Mass.

But to conclude by bringing this to the Mass:
Those two men "recognised Him in the breaking of the Bread"(Lk 24:35).
We too, if we bring our problems to Jesus in the Mass, when we see Him here before us in the Eucharistic species, this is what enables us to see that this same Lord and God has been with us through everything else. Even when we feel alone, He is by our side.


____________________________

Footprints in the Sand
One night I dreamed I was walking along the beach with the Lord. Many scenes from my life flashed across the sky.
In each scene I noticed footprints in the sand. Sometimes there were two sets of footprints, other times there was one only.
This bothered me because I noticed that during the low periods of my life, when I was suffering from anguish, sorrow or defeat, I could see only one set of footprints, so I said to the Lord,
“You promised me Lord, that if I followed you, you would walk with me always. But I have noticed that during the most trying periods of my life there has only been one set of footprints in the sand. Why, when I needed you most, have you not been there for me?”
The Lord replied, “The years when you have seen only one set of footprints, my child, is when I carried you.”

Mary Stevenson, 1936

____________________________

Footprints Hymn
to the tune 'Londonderry Air/O Danny Boy' by Dr Robert Atkins, 2004

Upon the shore, I walked with Him at even
And I looked back upon the path we’d trod
And in the sand I traced our way at even
And I was glad I’d walked through life with God:
For side by side we’d journeyed through together
All through the world’s wide wilderness of care
And side by side we’d journeyed through to even:
Safe at His side the Lord my God had brought me here.

But in my joy I caught a strain of sadness
To give me pause when thinking of my way
For on the shore I saw He’d left me lonely
When I had most the need of Him to stay:
When I was tired He’d left me worn and wandering,
He’d left me lone when I was fighting fears,
He’d let me tread the steepest slopes in solitude
Before He came back to my side to dry my tears.

But then the Lord drew near to me in comfort
And in His tenderness He made it plain
That in the times when dread and darkness threatened
He was my shield and shelter from the pain:
For on His shoulders He was gently bearing
And on His shoulders I from harm was free:
The single trace of footprints of the Master,
The single trace of footprints shows He carried me.

So on the shore I walk with Him at even;
I face the latter days of life secure,
For if my pilgrimage reserves me sorrow
The footprints show that He is strong and sure:
If I am near the gates of heaven weary,
No longer strong enough to stride alone
The footprints show that He is there to carry me:
The footprints show the Lord my God will bear me home.

Sunday, 23 April 2017

Thomas the Cynic, 2nd Sunday of Easter



Jn 20:19-31
We just heard about the man known as a "doubting Thomas", a person and label so significant that the name and phrase still lives on even in our post-Christian society.
Now, I have a theory about St Thomas that I'd like to share with you. St Thomas is often referred to as the classic skeptic, but I reckon he was actually a cynic.
The difference between a skeptic and a cynic is this:
A skeptic refuses to believe in anything,
A cynic believes in something, namely, he believes in evil, he believes in the worst about everything. If you say it's a nice sunny day, he sees the clouds coming. If you say how nice someone is, he points out his failings.
A skeptic refuses to believe in God because he doubts everything.
The cynic refuses to believe in God because he has been overwhelmed with the thought of evil instead -and this means that St Thomas has a very particular and valuable lesson for us.

My reason for saying Thomas was a cynic is this:
When the others said they had seen the Risen Lord, he didn't say, "Show me his risen body", but, like a cynic, he points to evil:
He speaks of the wounds that killed our Lord, of the experience of suffering, of what has gone wrong.

Now, Thomas wasn't always cynical. Earlier in the Gospels we see him expressing bravery, in fact, uttering one of the bravest statements in the Gospels: When Jesus set out for Jerusalem where He faced certain death, Thomas bravely said to the other apostles, "let us also go, that we may die with him"(Jn 11:16).

But by the start of today's gospel passage, this brave disciple seems to have changed dramatically, he had become cynical, and refused to believe. What had happened in between?
The Cross.
The experience of the suffering of the Cross had shattered his faith.
And suffering can destroy our faith too. We can allow an experience of evil to so overwhelm us that we no longer believe in the existence of what is good

Even though suffering is a time when we need our faith the most, to remind us that we are united to our loving Lord on the Cross, of the happiness that awaits us in heaven, of the fact that we have a loving Father who watches over us, even if we cannot see exactly how.
Just when we need our faith the most, pain can lead us to doubt these basic truths.

(pause) How does our Lord respond to the cynic's doubts?
The Lord points directly to what is worst, what is evil, and says He has triumphed over it.
In response to Thomas's doubts, our Lord showed him His wounds, showed His triumph.
The same Jesus who hung before on the Cross, also appeared to show that He had faced and overcome suffering. Thus Jesus says, "In the world you will have tribulation. But be of good cheer, for I have overcome the world"(Jn 16:33).

This is what enables us to have faith even though we live in a world where there is suffering.
Not because we deny that suffering is real.
But because we see that God has suffered with us, and for us, and even more, that He has triumphed over it, and promises US a share in His victory, if we but put our faith and trust in Him.
That's why St. John says, "this is the victory over the world: our faith"(1 Jn 5:4).

Every religion or philosophy must try to deal with the problem of suffering, but none can do so as well as Christianity. The cross and suffering are unique to Christ.
(pause) When our faith is tested by suffering, as it easily can be, when we feel like giving in to cynicism, we would do well to recall the sight of our Lord showing His triumphant wounds, a display that gives faith in Him credibility even in a world of tribulation.

Sunday, 16 April 2017

Proof of the Resurrection, Easter Sunday




We’re gathered here today because of an event that happened 2000 years ago: the resurrection of Jesus from the dead.
As we know, there are some people who think that the Resurrection never happened. I want to say a few words this morning about why the Gospel accounts of His Resurrection are worthy of having us acknowledge them as recording facts and not recording fables.

There are 3 points to make about the evidence for the Resurrection of Jesus Christ:
First, there is the fact that His tomb was empty. As the newsletter sheet insert from Josh McDowell summarises, there are no other convincing explanations as to how His tomb became empty: it is a fact calling for an explanation.
Second, there is the fact of the existence of the Church as body of people who claim Jesus rose from the dead. That Christians claim this is a fact, but WHY do they claim it? Where did the idea come from? This is another fact calling for an explanation.
The only explanation that coherently fits these 2 facts is that Jesus did in fact rise from the dead.
The third point I wish to make concerns the credibility of thinking this, in particular, concerns the credibility of believing the witnesses.

There were, as the Gospels record, certain witnesses who claimed that they saw Jesus after He rose of the dead. Now, as we all know, not everything someone says is to be believed –we need to test the reliability of a witness. And, about that issue, I want to point out that the first Christians were no fools, they knew it was a most remarkable thing these witness were claiming; they tested the claims to see if they were true.

There are 2 points we might test about a witness: was he actually there to see the event he claims to have witnessed? And, is the manner of his recounting straightforward or is it fanciful?
As you all know, we have 4 official ‘canonical’ gospels, 4 approved records of what Our Lord did and said, and of His resurrection appearances.
You are probably less familiar with the fact that there were other texts that claimed to be records, claimed to be ‘gospels’, but the Church tested them and found them unworthy of belief.
Some were dismissed on the simple grounds that they were not recorded by people who were actually there, being written much later.
Others were dismissed because the manner and style of their accounts was fanciful, claiming that Jesus acted more like a magician doing parlour tricks than a Messiah working miracles. So the alleged ‘gospel’ of Thomas has the boy Jesus showing off in front of other boys: they made clay birds, so he made his clay bird come to life![1] Similarly, the alleged ‘gospel’ of Peter alleges a triumphal procession coming out of the tomb, with cross in the procession.[2] While the alleged ‘gospel’ of Bartholomew describes “angels, fiery chariots, and God, descended to earth”[3] as part of the resurrection.

Now, my point is this, the type of description we find in the true Gospels are very different. They are simple, undramatic, matter of fact, the sort of descriptions made by reliable witnesses who were actually there.
It is characteristic of true witnesses that they do not feel a need to embellish their accounts with fanciful details.
So, for example, as we heard in our first reading, St Peter said very simply, “we have eaten and drunk with Him after His resurrection” (Acts 10:41). And, to take another example, the angels who appeared by the tomb are simply described as men “sitting in white”(Jn 20:12) –they are not described as having fancy wings, or fiery radiance. Or, to take a final example, when Jesus showed them the wounds in His hands and His feet, He simply said, “Look at my hands and my feet. It is I myself! Touch me and see; a ghost does not have flesh and bones, as you see I have.”(Lk 24:37)
–no fake drama, or flashes of lightning.
No need for melodramatics because they were describing what was true, what they had “seen and heard” (1 Jn 1:3).

This is why we are here today. We are not here because we think people normally rise from the dead, but because we recognise the unusual nature of this unique event. An unusual event, but the only explanation that fits the facts:
The tomb WAS empty,
the early Christians DID claim He had risen,
and their testimony is reliable.
And those 3 facts give us reason to put our faith in Christ, and to believe that the many things He promised them He promises us too, including what we proclaim in the creed: “the resurrection of dead”.

Footnotes:
[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infancy_Gospel_of_Thomas accessed 5/4/12
[2] An excerpt from the apocryphal Gospel of Peter:
“And in the night in which the Lord's day was drawing on, as the soldiers kept guard two by two in a watch, there was a great voice in the heaven; and they saw the heavens opened, and two men descend with a great light and approach the tomb. And the stone that was put at the door rolled of itself and made way in part; and the tomb was opened, and both the young men entered in. When therefore those soldiers saw it, they awakened the centurion and the elders, for they too were close by keeping guard. And as they declared what things they had seen, again they saw three men come forth from the tomb, and two of them supporting one, and a cross following them. And the heads of the two reached to heaven, but the head of him who was led by them overpassed the heavens. And they heard a voice from the heavens, saying, You have preached to them that sleep. And a response was heard from the cross, Yes”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Peter accessed 5/4/12
[3] “The Resurrection of Jesus Christ (by Bartholomew) is not to be confused with the Questions of Bartholomew, although either text may be the missing Gospel of Bartholomew (or neither may be), a lost work from the New Testament apocrypha. Subsequently, the text describes Jesus descending into hell, and, finding Judas there, preaching to him. Jesus rescues everyone from hell, except Judas, Cain, and Herod the Great. This is followed by a flashback described by a gardener to the night when angels, fiery chariots, and God, descended to earth, and resurrected Jesus.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resurrection_of_Jesus_Christ_(by_Bartholomew) accessed 5/4/12